New IMAX shows

Mysteries of the Unseen World

What you can’t see is right before your eyes!

– See more at: http://rhfleet.org/shows/mysteries-unseen-world#sthash.sbHy8Lmm.dpuf

 

Mysteries of the Unseen World

cat flea

 Mysteries of the Unseen World provides you with an incredible look at things that are normally too slow, too fast, too small or too vast for the human eye to see. The film’s innovative use of high-speed and time-lapse photography, electron microscopy and nanotechnology result in larger-than-life images that are stunning to see on the 76-foot Heikoff Giant Dome Theater screen. From the powerful thread of a spider’s web to the slow-motion shatter and splatter of a dropped pitcher of milk, Mysteries of the Unseen World invites you to look at the world in a whole new way. Narrated by Forest Whitaker.

Watch what it would be like to have X-ray vision or infra-red vision.
See the skin of a shark, the eye of a fruit fly and an eggshell magnified millions of times.
View spectacular slow-motion footage of popcorn popping, a Jesus lizard running on the surface of water and lightning rising up from the ground as well as striking from the sky.

Look Closely

The filmmakers worked with a 3-D medical animation company to depict the atom-scale realm of nano-science and potential innovations in nanotechnology. In a complex zoom sequence, the shot moves in on a spider, then a strand of its silk, then into the silk itself, where audiences see a bacterium. The camera then zooms even deeper, in on a virus on the bacterium, then into the DNA of the virus and finally into the actual atoms of the DNA.

pollen

The Film Team

An original production by National Geographic Entertainment and Days End Pictures, Mysteries of the Unseen World is produced by Jini Dürr (Sea Monsters: A Prehistoric Adventure) and Lisa Truitt (Mysteries of Egypt) and directed by Louie Schwartzberg (Disneynature: Wings of Life).

“Mysteries of the Unseen World immerses audiences in mind-bending dimensions that enhance our understanding of the planet and inspire people with the wonder and possibilities of science,” said Lisa Truitt, president of National Geographic Entertainment.

“The premise of this new giant screen film experience is looking at the world through a variety of imaging technologies that allow audiences to see beyond what they can with the naked eye and gain a new vision of the world around them,” said producer Jini Dürr.

The film is funded in part by a grant from the National Science foundation and generous support from Lockheed Martin and FEI, a manufacturer of electron microscopes.

head lice

Journey to the South Pacific

In a scene from the IMAX® film Journey to the South Pacific, young islander Jawi Mayor swims with a whale shark, the world’s largest shark and also its most docile.

Set sail on a breathtaking IMAX® adventure to the lush tropical islands of remote West Papua, where life flourishes above and below the sea. Join Jawi, a young island boy, as he leads a journey of discovery to this magical place. Home to more than 2,000 species of sea life, this exotic locale features the most diverse marine ecosystem on Earth, including enormous whale sharks, sea turtles and manta rays. An uplifting story of hope and celebration, Journey to the South Pacific highlights the importance of living in balance with the ocean planet we all call home. Narrated by Academy Award® winner Cate Blanchett.

Escape to a tropical paradise from the comfort of your Dome Theater seat.
Swim with the world’s largest sharks … without getting wet.
Follow a baby turtle on its perilous—but successful!—trip to the sea.
Meet Jawi, a 13-year old Papuan boy, as he travels with other islanders on the colorful Kalabia, a floating classroom that teaches villages how to protect their underwater treasure.

Did You Know … ?

It took four IMAX camera teams on a staggering 65‐hour journey from the U.S. to West Papua—with 25,000 pounds of IMAX equipment in tow—to make this film.

One team set off to explore life topside on the islands while two others honed the intricate art of underwater shooting amidst fast‐moving, unpredictable creatures; a fourth aerial team captured the awe‐inspiring perspectives that only come from high above.

Location, Location, Location

West Papua is the “wild west” of Indonesia, a country made up of more than 17,500 islands.
This province at the furthest, eastern‐most end of the vast island string remains one of the last truly isolated places on earth; it is home to 3 million people.
The region is in the center of the so‐called “Coral Triangle,” an area of such stunning biodiversity that it has been dubbed “the underwater Amazon jungle” and celebrated as the epicenter of all marine evolution.
In the crystal‐blue surrounding waters exists a kind of mega-library of sea life, including more than 75% of the coral species found on earth, and more than 40% of the world’s array of fish species.

– See more at: http://rhfleet.org/shows/journey-south-pacific#sthash.cJdtXEwg.dpuf

Mysteries of the Unseen World provides you with an incredible look at things that are normally too slow, too fast, too small or too vast for the human eye to see. The film’s innovative use of high-speed and time-lapse photography, electron microscopy and nanotechnology result in larger-than-life images that are stunning to see on the 76-foot Heikoff Giant Dome Theater screen. From the powerful thread of a spider’s web to the slow-motion shatter and splatter of a dropped pitcher of milk, Mysteries of the Unseen World invites you to look at the world in a whole new way. Narrated by Forest Whitaker. West Coast Premiere!

  • Watch what it would be like to have X-ray vision or infrared vision.
  • See the skin of a shark, the eye of a fruit fly and an eggshell magnified millions of times.
  • View spectacular slow-motion footage of popcorn popping, a Jesus lizard running on the surface of water and lightning rising up from the ground as well as striking from the sky.

 

– See more at: http://rhfleet.org/shows/mysteries-unseen-world#sthash.sbHy8Lmm.dpuf

Mysteries of the Unseen World provides you with an incredible look at things that are normally too slow, too fast, too small or too vast for the human eye to see. The film’s innovative use of high-speed and time-lapse photography, electron microscopy and nanotechnology result in larger-than-life images that are stunning to see on the 76-foot Heikoff Giant Dome Theater screen. From the powerful thread of a spider’s web to the slow-motion shatter and splatter of a dropped pitcher of milk, Mysteries of the Unseen World invites you to look at the world in a whole new way. Narrated by Forest Whitaker. West Coast Premiere!

  • Watch what it would be like to have X-ray vision or infrared vision.
  • See the skin of a shark, the eye of a fruit fly and an eggshell magnified millions of times.
  • View spectacular slow-motion footage of popcorn popping, a Jesus lizard running on the surface of water and lightning rising up from the ground as well as striking from the sky.

 

Look Closely

The filmmakers worked with a 3-D medical animation company to depict the atom-scale realm of nano-science and potential innovations in nanotechnology. In a complex zoom sequence, the shot moves in on a spider, then a strand of its silk, then into the silk itself, where audiences see a bacterium. The camera then zooms even deeper, in on a virus on the bacterium, then into the DNA of the virus and finally into the actual atoms of the DNA.

 

– See more at: http://rhfleet.org/shows/mysteries-unseen-world#sthash.ta3Kr7UC.dpuf

14 Responses

  1. Can’t wait to see this film!

  2. My kids and I are looking for ward to the Grand Re-Opening of the IMAX theater.

  3. I am a huge fan of the IMAX. But I will pass this one.

    We just saw a similar film at the Smithsonian IMAX in D.C. and didn’t enjoy watching animals kill and eat each other on the big screen. Many families with children left because the kids were crying.

    Looking forward to the reopening, at any rate!

  4. I was on the edge of my seat in that short time, I cant wait to see the whole film!!!! 🙂

  5. Thank you, Jennifer, for passing on that bit of information regarding this particular movie. I know now not to take my 5 year old grandson. And, like you, am looking forward to the Grand Reopening!

  6. I can’t wait to see the IMAX film in the new IMAX dome theater and take my son Ishwar and daughter Anjali to see it together. Looking forward to it!!

  7. I love the ocean. It would be nice if they showed some surfing. I requested that they put in ear-jacks for Spanish and Chinese dubbing. I hope they took my suggestion.

  8. Since OMNIMAX premiered in 1973 at the Reuben H. Fleet Space Theater and Science Center showing two OMNIMAX features, Voyage to the Outer Planets and Garden Isle, I have been waiting for a breakthrough to excite me back again. And this film certainly does that for me. Congrads on bringing this film to San Diego!

  9. I cannot wait to see the films in the new dome. Please keep me informed on any new advances.

    Thank you.

    Love the Dome.

  10. I can’t wait to see the new dome. Being raised in San Diego the Reuben H. Fleet Space Theater was a big part of my life. Now I’ve been able to introduce my son and he LOVES it! This film shows nature as God intended and teaches kids about the life cycle. I can’t wait to take my son to see it!

  11. Oh my goodness! My granddaughter & I will definitely be going to see this!

  12. I can hardly wait to see the transformation of the Theater. See you in Decenber.

  13. Of course, I haven’t seen one yet, but from the trailers I have seen I definitely will see all of them as soon as the IMAX screen is available.
    I have been told that the opening will be in December; is that correct? Will the vouchers that expire in 2008 be extended four mounths as the 2009 vouchers will?
    Of the three, I like Van Gogh, and the lions best. There’s nothing wrong with the film about wild fishing of porpoises and sharks, but it’s too much like other films you have shown. The lion singing opera was great, and Van Gogh couldn’t be better!

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